Lesson Study

Cycle 1

Kindergarten

Collaboration and Literacy

View Cycle 2

View Cycle 3

THE TEAM

Host: Michelina Miedema

Members: Addy Rigdon & Dayna Motta

THEORY OF ACTION

IF we as teachers provide opportunities for voice and collaboration with various modalities for students to actively participate, THEN students will be motivated and collaboratively engage with the lesson, RESULTING IN every student participating, feeling valued, and contributing to a sense of belonging in the classroom.

RESEARCH QUESTION

What does collaboration and balanced participation during literacy instruction

look like in a socially diverse kindergarten classroom?

GOALS

CONTENT GOAL:

Students will understand that all stories have a beginning and an end where story elements carry through. Students will create a realistic prediction for the end of the story.

EQUITY GOAL:

Students will listen, take turns, and build ideas collaboratively during small group activity.

THE TEAM

Host: Michelina Miedema

Members: Addy Rigdon & Dayna Motta

THEORY OF ACTION

IF we as teachers provide opportunities for voice and collaboration with various modalities for students to actively participate, THEN students will be motivated and collaboratively engage with the lesson, RESULTING IN every student participating, feeling valued, and contributing to a sense of belonging in the classroom.

RESEARCH QUESTION

What does collaboration and balanced participation during literacy instruction

look like in a socially diverse kindergarten classroom?

GOALS

CONTENT GOAL:

Students will understand that all stories have a beginning and an end where story elements carry through. Students will create a realistic prediction for the end of the story.

EQUITY GOAL:

Students will listen, take turns, and build ideas collaboratively during small group activity.

FOCUS STUDENTS

As the host teacher, I chose two different students that I felt might be challenged by collaboration. I hypothesized that each of these focus students would feel challenged for different reasons. My team and I worked to dissect the thinking of these two students, and worked to

research and discover support that we could incorporate into our lesson. 

Then we sing the song again to remind ourselves of what we will do next. Then we will use this chart created by student voice to remind us of our norms.

Students share ideas on the rug using the talking stick while teacher circulates and checks in with groups.

Students get to work with their groups. They need to ask “Is it ok if I add _____?” before adding anything to their paper. The goal is for all voices to be heard, and all friends to add to the story ending. 

Student collaborate and work for about 25 minutes. The teacher circles around the room. 

Students clean up and come to the rug to share. Teacher selects two groups to share (FS1’s group and FS2’s group.Each student shares their ideas to the class and explains how they turned 3 ideas into 1.

 

Focus Student 1 Group Work

 

 

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ANTICIPATORY PLANNING

As a  team we anticipated how our focus students would focus on this task while on the rug, and how they would collaborate with their team during work time.  

RESEARCH, LESSON & OBSERVATION

Launch: Teacher invites students to sing the instructional song called “What Will Happen Next?” It’s in the tune of Bingo, if you want to give it a shot!

Next, teacher follows instructions in the song and reads the class the start of a new book. This book was handwritten  with character and content inspiration based on FS1 and FS2’s interests.

 

Read the whole book here - Chester and Bella's Island

Read the previous lesson's book here - The Lonely Pumpkin

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Focus Student 2 Group Work

DEBRIEF & REFLECTION

Michelina 

Growing this lesson idea into a full unit has been an experience. The idea for the “What Will Happen Next?” lesson structure started as something small and turned into a class routine through trial and error, tears, and making changes based on feedback. I enjoyed talking about focus students and hearing the data that my group members gathered. I loved writing stories specifically for my students, and making up songs and movements with my class. I was amazed at their growth of collaboration during this series of lessons.  Overall this was a challenging process, especially as a brand new teacher. Finding time and space to incorporate our series of lessons was hard work, but I am proud of the lesson that we developed together. 

 

Addy

 Seeing young students grapple with collaboration and independence was inspiring. Kindergarteners were able to share, listen, combine ideas, and ultimately create beautiful work. This would not have been possible without Michelina’s carefully scaffolded group work norms and procedures. I am feeling very excited about shared writing work, and giving students chances to collaborate on tasks that are truly creative and have no “right answer.” 

 

Dayna

 Taking turns in an intentional way helped English language learners collaborate with their peers. Sharing ideas amongst peers in a diverse group of different perspectives and needs can be intimidating, but thoughtful and intentional scaffolds helped all students participate. Key Learnings

“Success” looks different for every child and group. Teachers can help their students succeed by anticipating student thinking and implementing scaffolds and strategies accordingly.

Building excitement and incorporating student interest goes a long way in increasing student engagement and encouraging equitable participation.